niall logan

loch sunart from ardslignish
£650.00
28.5 x 38.5 cm
kilmalieu bay, loch linnhe
£595.00
24.0 x 32.0 cm
camus an lighe - the singing sands, ardnamurchan
£695.00
34.0 x 44.0 cm
two arches, much snow
£595.00
24.0 x 34.0 cm
strontian river in spate
£595.00
24.0 x 34.0 cm
autumn in ardgour
Sold
24.0 x 35.0 cm
ben nevis from ardgour
Sold
29.0 x 38.0 cm
garbh beinn & coire an lubhair, ardgour
Sold
29.0 x 38.0 cm
loch sunart
Sold
26.0 x 34.5 cm
loch linnhe - winter afternoon
Sold
34.0 x 24.0 cm
loch linnhe - midwinter shore
Sold
24.0 x 34.0 cm
ariundle woods
Sold
33.0 x 27.0 cm
niall logan

Niall Logan moved from Bristol to Glasgow in the early 1980s to take up a lectureship in bacteriology, and settled in the rural parish of Baldernock. Inspired by the Scottish landscape, and its vernacular buildings and archaeology, he began painting at that time. Since retirement, what began as a pastime has developed into a consuming creative activity. He started with watercolour, but soon found oil to be his natural medium, and the dynamism of linen makes it his preferred surface. Subjects tend to suggest themselves by their visual impact, distinctive lighting, weather conditions, and ephemeral nature. The objective is to capture a scene that is unmistakably Scottish. It is hoped that the viewer will not only see what it was like to be there, but – perhaps – to hear it and smell it too?

niall logan

Niall Logan moved from Bristol to Glasgow in the early 1980s to take up a lectureship in bacteriology, and settled in the rural parish of Baldernock. Inspired by the Scottish landscape, and its vernacular buildings and archaeology, he began painting at that time. Since retirement, what began as a pastime has developed into a consuming creative activity. He started with watercolour, but soon found oil to be his natural medium, and the dynamism of linen makes it his preferred surface. Subjects tend to suggest themselves by their visual impact, distinctive lighting, weather conditions, and ephemeral nature. The objective is to capture a scene that is unmistakably Scottish. It is hoped that the viewer will not only see what it was like to be there, but – perhaps – to hear it and smell it too?