judith davies

porcelain ceramic wall piece II
£160.00
22.0 x 22.0 cm
ceramic wall piece I
£160.00
22.0 x 22.0 cm
small touchstone I
£125.00
9.0 x 8.0 cm
seastone
£800.00
11.0 x 31.0 cm
blue green seastone
Sold
12.0 x 26.0 cm
small touchstone II
Sold
10.0 x 9.0 cm
indigo blue touch stone
Sold
9.5 x 13.0 cm
judith davies

After initially graduating with a degree in Illustration from Manchester Polytechnic in 1978, Judith Davies went on to earn a Post Graduate Diploma in Ceramics from Goldsmiths, and an MA in ceramics from the University of Central Lancashire in 2013. Her artworks take inspiration from the tideline, responding to the movement of water over sand: ripples, channels and indents and the small objects the sea gives up to land. Judith’s eye and hand are always drawn to edges, curves and particularities of detail and texture. Her work is extremely tactile, and each piece is unique.


Judith’s ceramics are hand-built from porcelain in a slow and careful process using pinching and coiling methods. Developed through experimentation, her technique involves embedding textures into each piece then, after firing, applying pigments to the surface. These are then washed back, layering in colour and revealing textures and unique markings.  Each work is finished with wax, and in some pieces wax is inlayed into holes and crevices. 

judith davies

After initially graduating with a degree in Illustration from Manchester Polytechnic in 1978, Judith Davies went on to earn a Post Graduate Diploma in Ceramics from Goldsmiths, and an MA in ceramics from the University of Central Lancashire in 2013. Her artworks take inspiration from the tideline, responding to the movement of water over sand: ripples, channels and indents and the small objects the sea gives up to land. Judith’s eye and hand are always drawn to edges, curves and particularities of detail and texture. Her work is extremely tactile, and each piece is unique.


Judith’s ceramics are hand-built from porcelain in a slow and careful process using pinching and coiling methods. Developed through experimentation, her technique involves embedding textures into each piece then, after firing, applying pigments to the surface. These are then washed back, layering in colour and revealing textures and unique markings.  Each work is finished with wax, and in some pieces wax is inlayed into holes and crevices.